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information about Fukushima published in English in Japanese media info publiée en anglais dans la presse japonaise

Not forgotten - At least not by everybody

April 1, 2017

Mainichi photo page showing Hiroshima A-bomb aftermath draws attention at U.N.

 

 

 

 

 

(Mainichi Japan)

 

 

Ambassador Thomas Hajnoczi (Mainichi)

NEW YORK -- The permanent representative of Austria to the United Nations in Geneva has told the Mainichi Shimbun he hopes a treaty on the nuclear weapons ban being negotiated at the U.N. headquarters here will include the term "hibakusha" -- a Japanese word for those exposed to radiation.

Ambassador Thomas Hajnoczi, who played a leading role in five days of international negotiations between March 27 and 31, told the Mainichi that he is lobbying other participating countries to push for the addition of "hibakusha" in the treaty's preamble, and said he believes the word will indeed be included since no countries are opposed to the idea.

The term "hibakusha" used here is not just referring to survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombings, but those who were exposed to radiation from nuclear tests around the world.

The Austrian representative emphasized during a meeting on March 31 that articles on support measures for the victims of nuclear blasts should be included in the treaty since it will focus on human rights issues derived from nuclear weapons.

He also touched on the speeches made by atomic bombing survivors invited to the talks during the March 28 meeting and said he was moved by them. He argued that in the preamble, it is important to refer to suffering that the victims of nuclear explosions have been going through, a central part of the treaty.

Toshiki Fujimori, assistant secretary general of the Japan Confederation of Atomic and Hydrogen Bomb Sufferers Organizations, who was exposed to the atomic bomb in Hiroshima, told the U.N. meeting on March 27 that the treaty must reflect the calls of hibakusha "in express terms so that the world makes remarkable progress toward nuclear weapons abolition."

Another hibakusha from the Hiroshima bombing, Setsuko Thurlow, who now lives in Canada, also made an address during the meeting, saying that she wanted the world to feel the souls of those who died in the two bombings.

 

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